Mirror Of Haze, music that alludes to rebirth and resurrection | Interview

Mirror Of Haze expresses feelings and emotions through dark, hypnotic grooves.


Mirror Of Haze is a band, or a solo project, if you prefer, from Norway. The mastermind behind Mirror Of Haze, and its dark words and sounds around it, is Vadym. Mirror Of Haze released their debut full length album, "The End Is The Beginning", on February 15th, via Wave Records. An album that is definitely one of the highlights for 2021.

In "The End Is The Beginning", Vadym manages to create a cold, dark ambience through mixed, gothic sounds, post-punk influences with sharp guitar riffs, strong bass lines, rhythmic drums and melodic deep vocals. With a variety in the sound and influenced from pure goth rock like Fields Of The Nephilim, till dreampop and shoegaze melodies from Slowdive, Mirror of Haze are describing stories of fading memories, losses, and a life into a void, while Vadym writes, sings and composes music in dark poetry about life and death.

I had the pleasure to talk with Vadym about Mirror Of Haze, the melancholy of their sound, the influences and the strange times into "The End Is The Beginning" was written. 

ES: Hello Mirror Of Haze. Thank you for this interview. Let's begin with some words for you. Can you tell us a few words about Mirror Of Haze and introduce yourselves?

Thank you for having me. My name is Vadym, and Mirror Of Haze is my solo project. It all started back in January 2020 when I picked up my guitar and decided it’s time to write some new music. Or perhaps at first it wasn’t even about songwriting or starting a new project, I was just messing around with different guitar pedals and alternate tunings. And then the pandemic came and I got more time to put everything together and turn my initial sketches into complete songs.


ES: "The End Is The Beginning". Your debut album released earlier this year. Would you like to tell us a few things about it? Which is the concept idea behind "The End Is The Beginning"?

One of the main ideas behind the album is the concept of eternal return, that all existence has been recurring, and will continue to recur. I’m not gonna talk too much philosophy here, but I think you can find that even in small details of our life. When every day is the same, we’re trying to break the circle, but feel powerless. Or when we loose any sense of control over our circumstances and think there is no way out. But it’s not only doom and gloom, every song is a small story on its own, and the album title alludes to rebirth and resurrection.

ES: From the very beginning of the album, with The "Drifting the Void" there is a strong sense of melancholy, nostalgia and an equal ambience. Which are the things that influence you more in creating this atmosphere?

Music for me is one of the ways to express my feelings and emotions. I don’t usually set it as a goal to write melancholic songs, but somehow it just happens naturally. There’s probably many reasons for that, and one of them is the music I enjoy listening to. I’ve always been into dark and hypnotic grooves, no matter what genre it is. And of course it finds its place in the music I make. Why do I like this kind of atmosphere? That is a good question. I guess I just find comfort in it. But I understand it’s not for everyone.

ES: Lyrics in most of the tracks reveal a haunting story including lost hopes and living into a void. Where do you get you inspiration from, lyric-wise?

Some of the song ideas and concepts came from the philosophy books I had a pleasure to read last year. I was also inspired by the imagery and the literary allusions of The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. The poem was written in the aftermath of the Spanish Flu, so I think it has deep resonance one hundred years later in these times of another pandemic. I’m a big fan of abstract lyrics. There’s always some story or a hidden message behind the words, but I prefer to leave it open for interpretation.

ES: The sense that "The End Is The Beginning" leaves to the listener is a deep, dark and dystopic mood and diving into a haze of despair. Is this what you wanted to accomplish? Have you experienced such a situation that drew you into writing and composing in such a dark and melancholic way?

Life is not all sunshine and rainbows, you know. I’m trying to be honest, and this kind of music is just a reflection of the world we are living in. Having said that, I don’t want to play with anyone emotions and make the music that can cause discomfort and anxiety. It’s actually quite the opposite. I believe there are people who will listen to so-called “dark” music in order to hear something they can relate to. And this makes them feel they are not alone.

ES: Music-wise, sounds like you are influenced of a variety of dark artists and bands from the 80's till now. Which are your main influences?

I tend to listen to a lot of different music, but my preferences are usually somewhere between Post-Punk and Shoegaze. I really like what’s happening on the darkwave scene these days. Drab Majesty is probably one my favorite modern artists, I love their guitar work and truly unique atmospheres. Then of course there are the classic bands from the 80s, like The Cure, The Chameleons and Fields of the Nephilim, just to name a few. Their music is like an infinite source of inspiration for me, I can listen to some of their albums any day and in any mood. And you probably don’t hear that in the music I’ve released so far, but I’m also a big fan of Slowdive and other moody Shoegaze and Dreampop bands of the 90s.

ES: Your album was released in a strange period of time for the whole world. Is this a fact that affected the album any aspect? In music, lyrics, production?

I think this isolation and the feeling of uncertainty about the future is affecting us in one way or another. I would probably have written similar kind of music anyway, but sometimes certain melodies or lyric ideas appear subconsciously, and you can only guess where it actually came from. But simply put, yes, I think this album captures the mood of this period of time. It wouldn’t be the same if this pandemic never happened.


ES: Which were the challenges that you faced since the beginning and until the release of "The End Is The Beginning"?

Promotion and distribution was the most difficult part of all this, especially when you are a brand new band. I reached out to a lot of different independent labels and didn’t even hear back from most of them. Wave Records were kind to release the album and I’m really grateful for their help and support. Also it’s a big job to work on everything alone, so I’m very open for collaboration and would be happy to work with like-minded people. Just send me a message if you have any cool ideas. It could be a music video, guest appearance, or perhaps you are a new member of the band :)

ES: "The End Is The Beginning" released in February. Which are the next moves for Mirror Of Haze? What can we expect next?

There are a couple of new songs already in the works and potentially a new album next year. I've got some new guitars and pedals to play with, so be ready for a new sound. There’s also one guest appearance that I’m pretty happy about.

ES: Considering the current global circumstances and the restrictions in live appearances due to pandemic, which are your plans regarding the promotion of "The End Is The Beginning"?

Mirror Of Haze started as a studio project, and pandemic wasn’t the only reason for that. I also have a day job and family, so not sure yet how live gigs and potential traveling will fit into all this. I did one live from home appearance for Wave Records online party, but that’s of course not the same as performing on stage. Will see if there is demand and how feasible it is in the future. Bandcamp, CDs, streaming platforms, articles and interviews are my only ways of promoting Mirror Of Haze music at the moment.

ES: We've seen a huge effort from everyone involved with the music to promote through online platforms and live streaming events? What do you think about that and how do you feel? Do you think that it is something that it is here to stay and is it helpful for the artists?

With shows canceled, live streaming events and online platforms are the only place for artists to engage with fans, promote their music and reach the right audience. For many independent artists it’s also the only source of income today. I think 2020 changed the music industry forever. It’s hard to predict how things will be when we get back to normal, but thanks to this tremendous support from the community I believe we can go through this difficult time together. Nothing can beat the live show, but even without restrictions it’s not always possible for fans to attend a concert and for artists to find a stage to play. In that case, technology is here to connect us.

ES: At this point I would like to thank you for this conversation? Would you like to add anything else? A few words about the readers and your fans?

Thanks a lot for inviting me! And thanks to everyone who listens to and supports Mirror Of Haze. Every play and follow counts and inspires me to work on new music. Stay tuned for future releases!

ES: Thank you very much. Looking forward to see you performing live and listen to your future work. I wish you will achieve all of your dreams and I am really glad to have spoken with you.

 Info:

https://waverecords.bandcamp.com/album/w121-mirror-of-haze-the-end-is-the-beginning

https://www.facebook.com/mirrorofhaze

https://instagram.com/mirrorofhaze

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5JPhP-g-AZFuUcUDPaiYVQ

https://mirrorofhaze.bandcamp.com/

 

 

About ElektroSpank - FMA - Online Music Magazine

ElektroSpank FMA is an online music magazine about the darkest side of our lives.

We write about Gothic, industrial, dark wave and all of their sub genres. ElektroSpank FMA is not only about music, but for the dark, Gothic lifestyle as well. We try to support the music and scenes we love. For those who have never heard about ElektroSpank before please visit our about page for more info and history.

Back to Top